Wednesday 4 July 2012

Remploy Vote For Strike Action

First day of strike action a great success – see report here

Trade unionists pledge support for Remploy fight – see report here

Copied from GMB

OVERWHELMING VOTE FOR INDUSTRIAL ACTION OVER THE CLOSURE OF 54 REMPLOY FACTORIES WITH THE LOSS OF 2,800 DISABLED WORKERS JOBS

 

We now have the prospect of Remploy workers taking strike action to defend their jobs to avoid their certain destiny of being chucked on the economic scrapheap says unions

 

Members of GMB and Unite employed by Remploy in 54 factories across the country have voted by an overwhelming majority to take part in strikes and other industrial action to protest against the closure of the factories and disabled workers being forced in to unemployment. The trade union side in Remploy will give 7 days notice with immediate effect for a programme of strikes and other action.

 

The majority for strike action was 79.5% of the vote in the GMB. The majority for action short of a strike was 87.3% in GMB. The figures for Unite are 59.7% in favour of strike action and 76.1% in favour of action short of a strike.

 

There was a Ministerial statement on 7th March the House of Commons to announce the closure of 36 of the 54 remaining Remploy sites with compulsory redundancy for 1,752 people of whom 1,518 of these are disabled. The statement envisages the complete closure of all 54 factories in due course leading to 2,800 disabled workers jobs being lost. A 90 day consultation period was due to end last month (June) but it has been extended.

 

The Remploy factories schedules to close in the first wave are as follows: Aberdare, Aberdeen, Abertillery, Acton, Ashington, Barking, Barrow, Birkenhead, Bolton, Bridgend, Bristol, Chesterfield, Cleator Moor, Croespenmaen, Edinburgh, Gateshead, Leeds, Leicester, Manchester, Merthyr Tydfil, Motherwell, Newcastle, North London, North Staffs, Oldham, Penzance, Pontefract, Poole, Preston, Southampton, Spennymoor, Springburn, Swansea, Wigan, Worksop and Wrexham.

 

Phil Davies GMB National Secretary said, “The government’s intention to destroy thousands of disabled workers jobs in Remploy has given rise to an overwhelming vote for strike action against the proposed closures of their 54 factories. These closures are going ahead without any consideration of the feelings and needs of these workers and their families or their future job prospects. To close a factory that employs disabled people in the present economic climate is a sentence to life of unemployment and poverty.”

 

Kevin Hepworth, Unite National Officer said, “We now have the prospect of Remploy workers taking strike action to defend their jobs. By taking strike action they are trying to avoid their certain destiny of being chucked on the economic scrapheap. They deserve the support of all trade unionists and the public in Britain.”

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1 comment

  1. Jean Ashlan said:

    Maria Miller and Iain Duncan Smith need to announce an immediate halt to the threat to close Remploy factories. They should address the chore issues surrounding the mis-management of Remploy, take remedial action by putting an end to excessive bonuses and consultancy fees etc. that the Remploy Board have been enjoying and ensure, in future, Remploy is managed more competently by dedicated, competent management. The 1700 disabled Remploy factory workers are hard-working, loyal, dedicated workers who deserve to be treated better. Why is this Govt. punishing 1700 vulnerable, disabled factory workers for the failings of the Remploy Board? Thousands of people up and down the country have signed petitions opposing Remploy closures, thousands have taken to the streets in protest, MP’s have called for Parliamentary debates denoucing the plans to close Remploy factories – Maria Miller, Iain Duncan Smith – why aren’t you listening? Maria Miller and Iain Duncan Smith are cleary indifferent to, and ignorant of, the suffering and devastation they are causing to Remploy employees and their families.

    4 July 2012 at 9:09pm

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